allthecanadianpolitics

Anonymous asked:

Although i'm not a fan of Harper, i am happy that he won the 2011 federal election over Ignatieff. I could not imagine how our Country would be run under Ignatieff and although Harper is not the best Prime minister, I think he was one of the best choices at the time

allthecanadianpolitics answered:

Considering what Harper has done since 2011, I would not agree:

-Passed Omnibus bill C-10 to further the conservatives tough on crime agenda (despite Canada’s crime being at a record low). Source (x)

-Removed the Long Gun Registry, despite widespread opposition (including the police who find it invaluable in crime prevention). Source (x)

-Withdrew from the Kyoto Protocol; the only country in the world to do so. Source (x)

-The PMO became involved with a secret money cover up (the Senate Scandal). Source (x)

-Prorogued Parliament AGAIN for political purposes (2013). Source (x)

-Was found in Contempt of Parliament (first time this has ever happened in the British Commonwealth). Source (x)

-Bev Oda steps down for overspending on the public’s dime. Source (x)

-The Harper government cut half the staff BC’s fisheries and oceans department and closed all but 5 of their offices in BC right before that department was planning on doing an assessment on enbridge’s pipeline. Source (x)

-Has black-listed environmental charities in a smear campaign. Source (x)

-Removed environmental protections on bodies of water & removed mandatory environmental assessments. Source (x)

-Has cut 36 billion dollars out of healthcare (will take effect in 2015). Source (x)

-UN has warned canada about issues of poverty, hunger and nutrition. The government has ignored them. Source (x)

-The government refuses to start an inquiry into missing and murdered aboriginal women or do anything concrete to fix the problem. Harper even denied that it was a social problem. Source (x)

-The 2011 voter suppression scanadal (i.e. Robocalls). The calls have been associated with the conservative party. Source (x)

-PMO Bruce Carson charged with Fraud, illegal lobbying. Source (x)

-Tried to hide details of the parliamentary finances from the FINANCIAL BUDGET OFFICER, Kevin Page. Source (x)

-The conservative party was found guilty of cheating in their previous election by overspending. Source (x)

-Pamela Wallin, a Harper appointed senator was suspended following audits over her expense claims. Another Senator, Brazeau appointed by Harper has also run into legal trouble in this scandal (He was also charged with sexual assault in a domestic case). Source (x)

-The Human Rights Watch has called out Stephen Harper over his comments on first nations women and their difficulties from filing abuse complaints to police (police brutality, racism, etc). Source (x)

-The government specifically cuts programs related to Women’s health. Source (x)

-Defunded a prominent gender equality and human rights agency: Rights & Democracy. Source (x)

-Excluded contraception measures in its initiative to improve the health of mothers in poor countries, claiming that it ‘doesn’t save lives’. Source (x)

-Approved the Northern Gateway pipeline despite overwhelming opposition from BC and aboriginal groups. Source (x)

There are loads more, but I think this speaks plenty for this government.

sounddiplomacycities
sounddiplomacycities:

Music is at the heart of a healthy, thriving, liveable, sustainable city.  Not only in the openness of cultural creation and delivery, but also in influencing how residents view where they choose to live and work.  However, when music policy is applied to urban planning, large scale initiatives (such as Olympic bids and branding) and city development, the impact of and on the music industry is not often thoroughly considered.  However, the music industry impacts a number of key imperatives in city / municipal development and urban affairs, from singular sector development to education and training capacities, regulatory affairs, soft diplomacy and city branding, international network expansion and market development.  For a city, region or municipality to thrive, music industry development must be strategised within its key economic policies, as a healthy music (and greater cultural industries) output creates and sustains world-class cities.  
In our increasingly borderless world, where art can be discovered and heralded via an Internet connection, cities are competing to train and retain talent, drive new business ventures and economic prosperity, identify and encourage skilled immigration and define itself as globally leaders.  By appealing to skilled young entrepreneurs and creating economically prosperous centres and creative clusters, city development, image and branding are enhanced.  This turns cities in future cities and smart cities, and one of the key variables to attaining and creating such development is by supporting cultural development with an economic strategy.  
At Sound Diplomacy: Cities, we believe that a healthy, robust music industry impacts not only musicians, managers, labels, publishers, venue goers, consumers and copyright holders, but also a number of secondary and tertiary industries from food vendors at music festivals to sound and light providers, local bars and restaurants and infrastructure providers such as logistic companies, utility providers and hospitality.  However, too often cities have talent (the artists) but lack business people in the contemporary music industry, leading to a dearth in sustainable career development.  When this occurs, the creator migrates elsewhere, impacting the entire value chain that surrounds them, from the bars and restaurants they perform in to the equipment they hire and the transport they use to reach the venue.  Music is part of a city’s central nervous system.  By analysing educational provisions, licensing, live music policy, music industry development and education, economic impact, festival impacts, taxation and business support mechanisms, a healthy music industry can and does create the world’s most liveable, smartest and most desirable cities.  This is the mission of Sound Diplomacy: Cities.  We use music industry development strategy to make cities (or neighbourhoods, regions and municipalities) an economic  return, via more prosperous and industrious music industry policies that engenders a more vibrant place to live and work. 
As the Hacienda branded Manchester and The Beatles branded Liverpool, there is an artist in your city right now who can be the next international star.  It is this robust analysis and strategy of what is needed and a series of delivery mechanisms to further enhance music industry development that will find them and provide them with the tools for international success.  That, in turns, brings a return the city and those who live and work within it.   
The picture above is of Adelaide, one of the most forward thinking cities in terms of music industry development. We’ll explain why soon. 


This company has it spot on. Sound Diplomacy!

sounddiplomacycities:

Music is at the heart of a healthy, thriving, liveable, sustainable city.  Not only in the openness of cultural creation and delivery, but also in influencing how residents view where they choose to live and work.  However, when music policy is applied to urban planning, large scale initiatives (such as Olympic bids and branding) and city development, the impact of and on the music industry is not often thoroughly considered.  However, the music industry impacts a number of key imperatives in city / municipal development and urban affairs, from singular sector development to education and training capacities, regulatory affairs, soft diplomacy and city branding, international network expansion and market development.  For a city, region or municipality to thrive, music industry development must be strategised within its key economic policies, as a healthy music (and greater cultural industries) output creates and sustains world-class cities.  

In our increasingly borderless world, where art can be discovered and heralded via an Internet connection, cities are competing to train and retain talent, drive new business ventures and economic prosperity, identify and encourage skilled immigration and define itself as globally leaders.  By appealing to skilled young entrepreneurs and creating economically prosperous centres and creative clusters, city development, image and branding are enhanced.  This turns cities in future cities and smart cities, and one of the key variables to attaining and creating such development is by supporting cultural development with an economic strategy.  

At Sound Diplomacy: Cities, we believe that a healthy, robust music industry impacts not only musicians, managers, labels, publishers, venue goers, consumers and copyright holders, but also a number of secondary and tertiary industries from food vendors at music festivals to sound and light providers, local bars and restaurants and infrastructure providers such as logistic companies, utility providers and hospitality.  However, too often cities have talent (the artists) but lack business people in the contemporary music industry, leading to a dearth in sustainable career development.  When this occurs, the creator migrates elsewhere, impacting the entire value chain that surrounds them, from the bars and restaurants they perform in to the equipment they hire and the transport they use to reach the venue.  Music is part of a city’s central nervous system.  By analysing educational provisions, licensing, live music policy, music industry development and education, economic impact, festival impacts, taxation and business support mechanisms, a healthy music industry can and does create the world’s most liveable, smartest and most desirable cities.  This is the mission of Sound Diplomacy: Cities.  We use music industry development strategy to make cities (or neighbourhoods, regions and municipalities) an economic  return, via more prosperous and industrious music industry policies that engenders a more vibrant place to live and work.


As the Hacienda branded Manchester and The Beatles branded Liverpool, there is an artist in your city right now who can be the next international star.  It is this robust analysis and strategy of what is needed and a series of delivery mechanisms to further enhance music industry development that will find them and provide them with the tools for international success.  That, in turns, brings a return the city and those who live and work within it.   

The picture above is of Adelaide, one of the most forward thinking cities in terms of music industry development. We’ll explain why soon.

This company has it spot on. Sound Diplomacy!

CBC Music presents their September music preview!

The preview includes 15 new albums from: 

Rose Cousinsthe Wooden SkyZeus,In-Flight SafetySloanSlow LeavesRich AucoinDeath from Above 1979the Wilderness of ManitobaAdam CohenLeonard Cohen,LightsSaukratesthe Rural Alberta Advantage and Buck 65.

Hit their site to stream these new tunes.